Thursday, October 27, 2016

Donald Trump’s Campaign Knows He’s Losing

With less than two weeks until Election Day, Donald Trump is, for the most part, still insisting to his supporters that he’s in the lead.
While he conceded in one radio interview Monday that he was “somewhat behind in the polls,” Trump said the same day that “I really believe we are winning” and claimed that “Democrats are making up phony polls.”
Members of his campaign, though, are openly admitting that the businessman is lagging behind.
Trump’s campaign manager, pollster Kellyanne Conway, also conceded that the GOP nominee was trailing, saying Sunday “we are behind.”
Although Trump says he no longer believes the polls, his internal data apparently mirrors what publicly available surveys are showing.
The campaign’s San Antonio-based research team is spending $100,000 a week on polling and is running simulations of the election, according to Bloomberg Businessweek ― and it’s coming up with results that look like most of the public forecasts, all of which give Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton an 85 percent or higher chance of victory.
“Nate Silver’s results have been similar to ours,” Brad Parscale, Trump’s digital director, told Bloomberg, “except they lag by a week or two because he’s relying on public polls.”
Silver’s website, FiveThirtyEight, currently gives Clinton a nearly 7-point national lead and shows her on track to win about 338 electoral votes to Trump’s 199.

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Cientistas afirmam ter desvendado mistério do "Triângulo das Bermudas''


Pesquisadores americanos dizem ter descoberto a resposta para o mistério que envolve o "Triângulo das Bermudas" em um novo documentário do Science Channel. A região, que está localizada entre Miami, Porto Rico e  Bermudas, ficou conhecida pelo alto número de aviões e navios que desapareceram por lá sem deixar vestígios e tem intrigado cientistas desde então.

Com ajuda de satélites, metereologistas afirmam agora ter encontrado na área a presença de nuvens hexagonais capazes de ocasionar ventos de até 270km/h - que poderiam facilmente, segundo eles, derrubar aviões e afundar navios.
As imagens do satélite são bizarras”, destaca o pesquisador Randy Cerveny, da Universidade do Arizona, referindo-se ao formatos hexagonal das nuvens. Ele explica ainda que esse tipo de formação sobre o oceano funciona, em essência, como "bombas de ar"."São rajadas de ar que partem debaixo das nuvens e atingem o oceano a velocidades perigosas capazes de criar ondas gigantes", detalha Cerveny no documentário.

Alguns especialistas, no entanto, têm contestado os meteorologistas por essa teoria não explicar o que aconteceria com os destroços de todos os aviões e navios que já sumiram por lá. Outros têm apontado que, embora tenham ocorrido alguns desaparecimentos no ''Triângulo das Bermudas'', eles são "estatisticamente insignificantes", dado o grande número de navios e aeronaves que passam pela área.

Monday, October 24, 2016


10 THINGS TO KNOW FOR TODAY
. LIMITED GAINS IN FIRST WEEK OF MOSUL OFFENSIVE
Iraqi forces push toward the city from all sides, battling militants near the Islamic State stronghold in a belt of mostly uninhabited towns and villages.
2. FRANCE MOVING MORE THAN 6,000 MIGRANTS
Lines of refugees walk to a registration center in the French port city of Calais, the first day of the mass evacuation and destruction of the filthy camp.
3. HOW ASSANGE IS CLOSER TO TESTING HIS HYPOTHESIS
With email dumps exposing the Clinton campaign, the WikiLeaks founder is waiting to see if total transparency can defeat an entrenched group of insiders.
4. HOW DEADLY TOUR BUS CRASH HAPPENED
A tour bus returning to Los Angeles from a casino trip slams into the back of a semi-truck slowing for a maintenance crew on a California highway, killing 13 and injuring 31.
5. TEEN FIGHTS ON AFTER BEING FELLED IN CHICAGO'S VIOLENCE
In a bloody year of more than 3,000 shootings in the city, one bullet has transformed the life of Jonathan Annicks.
6. MEDICAID EXPANDS UNDER OBAMA
But the federal-state program for low-income people faces real consequences depending on who wins the White House in November.
7. FAMED '60S ANTI-WAR ACTIVIST DIES
Tom Hayden, whose name became linked with the celebrated Chicago 7 trial, Vietnam War protests and ex-wife actress Jane Fonda was 76.
8. FOR SOME, RETIREMENT ONLY A DREAM
Studies find that about a third of low-wage workers say they'll never be able to afford to quit working.
9. BILL MURRAY FETED WITH TWAIN PRIZE FOR HUMOR
Jimmy Kimmel and Steve Martin are among those who rib the comedian for being aloof, unpredictable and difficult to reach - and somehow still lovable.
10. SEAHAWKS, CARDINALS KICKING THEMSELVES
Seattle's Stephen Hauschka and Arizona's Chandler Catanzaro miss short field goals that would have won the game in overtime and the NFC West rivals settle for a 6-6 tie.

Friday, October 21, 2016

Hillary Clinton is almost certain to be president


In the last debate of the election, Hillary Clinton emerged the way she hoped she would, as the all-but-certain first female president of the United States.
By refusing to pledge that he would accept the results of the election, Donald Trump all-but-certainly disqualified himself for the position of president. The peaceful transfer of power after a presidential election has been the pillar of our democracy. By refusing to accept the results of the vote, Trump would be flouting the tradition of American politics and the democratic beliefs of almost all voters. Like the two earlier debates, this one was contentious and marked by sniping between Trump and Clinton. But Trump’s claims were often far-fetched and lacked a shred of factual evidence. Especially bizarre was his baseless charge that the Clinton campaign was behind the allegations of nine women that Trump improperly groped or kissed them, charges that Trump has denied.
Some analysts thought Trump may have lost the election the day the disgusting tape of him bragging about his ability to kiss women and “grab them by the pussy” became public. His standing in battleground states and national polls diddrop precipitously and steadily after the tape became public.
But his constant claims of a rigged election and refusal to join his running mate, Mike Pence, in saying he’d accept the election results are equally, if not more, outrageous. They are intended to damage people’s confidence in the election process itself. So Trump blew his last best chance to present himself as a credible president, while Clinton, who maintained her composure throughout, radiated solidity. Going into Wednesday’s debate, her stature as a candidate was much greater than in the previous two. Most national polls of late show her with a prohibitive lead over Trump. With 20 days remaining before election day, it is all but impossible for him to make up the lost ground necessary to win the presidency.
So the debate had far lower stakes for Clinton than Trump. Her strategy was fairly simple: show Trump as not fit for the presidency, defend herself without seeming defensive or evasive and, most important, maintain the demeanor of an all-but-president. She did a masterful job of not letting Trump’s sharp attacks rile her. She did not assault Trump with as much sting as she had in the two past debates, though she still obviously got under his skin. He blurted out that she is “a nasty woman”.
Trump began the debate talking in a quiet voice and scoring some points against Clinton on issues like trade. But he soon lost focus and eventually fell to pieces, denying, when there is tape to prove it, that he had demeaned the appearances of his female accusers and interrupting Clinton repeatedly, practically shouting “wrong” after some of her assertions about his record. There was substantive discussion of issues, on foreign policy, the supreme court, the US budget deficit and abortion. Clinton repeated her support for a woman’s right to control her body, while Trump showed his revulsion of late-term abortions and repeatedly described it as “rip[ping] the baby out of the womb”.
Clinton evaded direct answers posed by the moderator, Fox’s Chris Wallace about her ethics and used her answers to accuse Trump of being Vladimir Putin’s “puppet,” a remark that clearly rankled with him.
But she was careful to be positive, too, saying that America is great because “its people are good”. She said she had devoted her life’s work to women and children and would devote her presidency to protecting them. Trump again provided a very dark vision of the United States. At times Clinton projected an almost regal bearing. She wore an elegant suit in white, a color she has favored at other key moments in her climb to the White House, including her Brooklyn victory rally after the primaries and at heracceptance speech at the Democratic convention. She clearly knows she is on the brink of making history once again.

'Nasty woman' is an insult we know all too well


Little girls are made of sugar and spice and everything nice but sometimes they grow up and life corrupts them. They metamorphosize from being sweet little girls into Nasty Women.
The most extreme case in point, as Donald Trump helpfully pointed out during yesterday’s debate, is Hillary Clinton. Not only did she get in her pretty little head that she wanted to run for president. She decided to carry on with the charade and answer real questions about policy during the debate. Worse still, she only let Trump interrupt her every few minutes – and I mean, everyone knows how much he respects women, he was just trying to help her out.
So while Clinton was explaining her views on funding social security, Trump decided to go ahead and say what everyone was thinking: Hillary Clinton is “such a nasty woman”.
They’re at work too. Nasty Women speak up too much. They’re too ambitious. Too aggressive. They’re not team players. Let’s be honest, they’re real bitches. They may get to the top, they may climb that greasy ladder, but at what cost? Nobody likes them. They probably never have sex. Their children probably hate them. They probably have no idea how to bake. They’re NastIt’s easy to become a Nasty Woman. It can happen in an instant. You can go to bed a perfectly nice person and wake up a Nasty Woman. But this doesn’t have to happen to you. You can remain a Nice Girl if you just try hard enough.Then there’s the internet. The internet is full of nasty women. They have opinions. They voice these opinions. They’re everywhere, these women. They don’t understand that technology is for the guys. They’ve got the vote, they can go to work, what do they need to go online for? Save a little space for the poor men out there.
t’s easy to become a Nasty Woman. It can happen in an instant. You can go to bed a perfectly nice person and wake up a Nasty Woman. But this doesn’t have to happen to you. You can remain a Nice Girl if you just try hard enough.
Nice Girls let men do the talking. They let men compliment them in whatever language that man might choose. They go to bed with a guy after a certain number of dates have elapsed and they have proved that they are a Nice Girl. They then marry that man. They stand by their man. Nice Girls do not complain. Nice Girls know their place. Nice Girls raise nice children. And Nice Girls definitely do not run for president.

10 THINGS TO KNOW FOR TODAY
. TRUMP, CLINTON TRADE BARBS AS ROAST TURNS BITTER
Many at the annual Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner turn on the Republican nominee midway through his remarks and shower him with jeers.
2. MILITANTS ATTACK POLICE COMPOUND IN NORTHERN IRAQ
The assault in Kirkuk is claimed by the Islamic State group and likely aimed at diverting the authorities' attention for the battle to retake Mosul.
3. EGYPT'S FIGHT AGAINST ISLAMIC MILITANCY MAKES ENEMIES
The decision to make fighting Islamic militants its overriding foreign policy objective brings Cairo closer to the Syrian president, Russia and Iran, in turn antagonizing its traditional Arab allies like Saudi Arabia.
4. BLACK PANTHERS LOOK BACK AT PARTY'S FOUNDING
Its 50th anniversary comes as the U.S. grapples anew with fatal encounters between African-Americans and law enforcement.
5. WHERE SAMARITANS PROVIDE A SANCTUARY
In a tense corner of the West Bank, a village of Samaritans connects Israelis and Palestinians even as violence drives them apart.
6. WHICH COUNTRY TO WITHDRAW FROM INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT
South Africa decides to leave the tribunal following a dispute over a visit by the Sudanese president, who is wanted by the ICC.
7. WHO BREAKS DOWN BARRIERS TO BE MORE INCLUSIVE
Toy companies are working harder to think outside their usual box by offering items like dolls with disabilities, female superhero figures and characters with a range of skin tones.
8. 'QUEEN OF KATWE' STIRS HOPE IN SLUM WHERE FILM WAS BORN
Poverty in Kampala can drive young people to despair or even violence, but chess is seen as a way out, and some locals cheer "a truly Ugandan story of hope."
9. RAISING VEGAN BABY
Parents who are raising their kids vegan say cases of abuse are not about veganism, but about neglect.
10. MASCOT HALL OF FAME GIVES CHEERLEADERS A SPOTLIGHT
At the Mascot Hall of Fame in Whiting, Indiana six candidates will be put on a ballot for induction at a groundbreaking ceremony.

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

10 THINGS TO KNOW FOR TODAY
1. CLINTON, TRUMP SET FOR LAST DEBATE
The prime-time showdown is perhaps Trump's last opportunity to right his floundering campaign, and Clinton is facing a new round of questions about her authenticity and trustworthiness.
2. FEDS TO DISPATCH FEWER ELECTION OBSERVERS
The Justice Department move is a result of a Supreme Court opinion that gutted a key provision of the Voting Rights Act.
3. HOW IS WOES ARE BEING COMPOUNDED
As the battle to retake Mosul is underway, the Islamic State group is being denied access to revenue sources that once amounted to more than $1 billion in 2014.
4. PHILIPPINE POLICE VAN RAMS PROTESTERS IN FRONT OF US EMBASSY
Hundreds of protesters had gathered to demand an end to the presence of U.S. troops in the country and to back a call for an independent foreign policy.
5. IN HARD-HIT BRAZIL, ZIKA COSTS SKYROCKET
The mothers of children with the mosquito-borne virus are struggling to find and afford expensive drugs that families must pay for because government health plans don't cover them.
6. RETRIAL SET FOR 1979 MISSING-CHILD CASE
Prosecutors try for a second time to convict a suspect in the 1979 disappearance of Etan Patz, a New York City first grader who vanished on his way to school.
7. CAMPUS DILEMMA: WHEN TO GO PUBLIC
A case of alleged sexual assaults at San Jose State stirs debate on when a university should alert its students about alleged attacks.
8. ROBOTIC SCAN FOR EQUINE COULD HOLD PROMISE
Veterinarians hope an innovative type of CT scan can advance medical care for horses - and possibly be adapted for humans.
9. WHAT HAS REAL CLOWNS CRYING INSIDE
A spate of scares involving people doing menacing things while dressed as clowns is no laughing matter for working clowns, who complain bookings have fallen off.
10. JOURNEYMAN BESTS ACE
Rich Hill outpitches reigning Cy Young Award winner Jake Arrieta and the Los Angeles Dodgers beat the Chicago Cubs 6-0 to take a 2-1 NL Championship Series lead.

Did Donald Trump Just Admit That He’s Going To Lose The Election?

Donald Trump may not be prepared to say he’ll officially accept the results of the election, but he appeared to concede during the final presidential debate Wednesday that he’s likely to lose to Hillary Clinton.
During a segment on “foreign hot spots,” Trump began by attacking plans to accept more Syrian refugees into the U.S., saying the country is effectively inviting Islamic State fighters to cross the borders in what would be a “great Trojan horse.” But as he capped off his attack, Trump seemed to let slip that he believed the supposed consequences of such actions would be Clinton’s to deal with.
“Wait until you see what happens in the coming years,” said Trump. “Lots of luck, Hillary. Thanks a lot for doing a great job.”
Maybe Trump is simply reading the writing on the wall. Current predictions suggest he has less than a 5 percent chance of winning in November, with polls showing him trailing by substantial margins in a number of key battleground states. Still, rather than focusing on improving his chances of victory by winning over voters, Trump has spent large portions of the last week complaining that the election isbeing “rigged” against him.

Thursday, October 13, 2016

Donald Trump, Slipping in Polls, Warns of ‘Stolen Election’

Donald J. Trump has lashed out at fellow Republicans, calling them “disloyal” and “far more difficult” than Hillary Clinton.
He has griped openly about a “rigged” political system, saying Wednesday he has “no respect” for the nonpartisan Commission on Presidential Debates and complaining about a “defective” microphone in the first debate.
And on Monday, at a rally in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., he worried the election could be “stolen” from him and singled out Philadelphia, a city with a large African-American population, warning, “We have to make sure we’re protected.”
Mr. Trump’s ominous claims of a “stolen election” — which he often links to black, urban neighborhoods — are not entirely new. But in recent days, he has been pressing the theme with a fresh intensity, citing everything from the potential for Election Day fraud to media bias favoring Mrs. Clinton to rigged debates.
The assertions — which coincide with Mr. Trump’s decline in the polls in the wake of a shaky first debate performance and accusations he forced himself on women — highlight concerns that he may not accept a Clinton victory, breaking from the traditional decorum of defeated presidential candidates and undermining the legitimacy of the election result.
At rallies in recent days, Mr. Trump has become a candidate seething with excuses, perhaps the clearest manifestation of his frustration with his current standing in the polls and the growing alarm within his campaign that a White House victory is slipping away.
On Monday, on a trip through Pennsylvania, Mr. Trump began the day urging the almost entirely white crowd outside Pittsburgh to show up to vote, warning about “other communities” that could hijack his victory.With less than a month until the election, Mr. Trump’s litany of grievances has come fast and furious as he has begun to slip again in the polls.
On Friday, Mr. Trump also asserted, without offering evidence, that the Obama administration was allowing illegal immigrants to enter the country to vote in November, another example of how he claimed the election was being rigged. “They’re letting people pour into the country so they can go and vote,” Mr. Trump said at a meeting he held in New York with the National Border Patrol Council, the union of border patrol agents.
There has been no evidence that the administration is delaying deportations of — or intentionally letting in — immigrants so they can vote. (Illegal immigrants are barred from voting in federal elections.)
Mr. Trump’s claims seem to be resonating among his supporters. At a campaign stop in Iowa on Tuesday, a woman stood up and, her voice quavering, said she feared “voter fraud” before offering a stark call to action to Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana, Mr. Trump’s running mate.
“If Hillary Clinton gets in, I myself, I’m ready for a revolution because we can’t have her in,” the woman said.
Mr. Pence has emerged as Mr. Trump’s most loyal defender. But the call to revolt was a step too far for him. “Yeah, don’t say that,” he said, shaking his right hand as if to try to brush away her comment.
He then tried for a more positive spin: “There’s a revolution coming on November the 8th,” he said. “I promise you.”

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

10 THINGS TO KNOW FOR TODAY

1. WIKILEAKS DUMP MAY FACE US PROBE
John Podesta, Hillary Clinton's top adviser, says the FBI is investigating Russia's possible role in hacking thousands of his personal emails.
2. HOW US COLLEGE CAMPUSES ARE REACTING TO TRUMP VIDEO
Many students and staff are working hard to curtail the problem of sexual assault, and the vulgar "Access Hollywood" video seems to fly in the face of their efforts.
3. THE EVOLVING FACE OF US IMMIGRATION
With all the talk of a border wall with Mexico, immigrants to the U.S. are now more likely to come from Asia, AP finds.
4. PRICE TAG ON MATTHEW DAMAGE IN BILLIONS
The hurricane impaired or destroyed thousands of homes, forced businesses from Florida to North Carolina to close and put many people temporarily out of work.
5. FOR HAITIANS, SOME RELIEF
Food, water and building supplies begin to reach remote corners of the Caribbean nation as tens of thousands slowly rebuild their lives after Matthew.
6. WHAT IS BECOMING A NEW CHALLENGE IN SYRIA
A U.S. military official tells AP that insurgent groups like Hezbollah and the Islamic State have learned how to weaponize surveillance drones.
7. TAKING CAMPAIGN TO LEGALIZE MARIJUANA FURTHER
Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union are urging the decriminalization of possession and personal use of all illicit drugs.
8. FALLOUT FOR SAMSUNG PERSISTS
Consumers from Shanghai to New York are reconsidering how they feel about the South Korean tech giant and its products, like the discontinued Galaxy Note 7.
9. AMAZON LAUNCHES FOR-PAY STREAMING MUSIC SERVICE
The online retailer is aiming to compete against other services like Spotify and Apple Music.
10. ONE STEP CLOSER TO WIPING OUT 'THE CURSE'
The Chicago Cubs are going back to their second consecutive NL Championship Series after finally ending San Francisco's remarkable winning streak in postseason elimination games.

More Women Come Forward With Donald Trump Groping Allegations


The New York Times is out with a bombshell report on two women who say Donald Trump groped them.
Jessica Leeds and Rachel Crooks spoke to the Times on the record about their encounters with the reality TV star. Both had told close friends of being assaulted by Trump, but neither had gone public with their story until Wednesday. A third woman, Mindy McGillivray, also accused Trump of groping her in a story published by the The Palm Beach Post shortly after the Times article appeared.
Leeds, now 74, said she was seated next to Trump on an airplane three decades ago when the businessman grabbed her breasts and attempted to reach up her skirt.
“He was like an octopus,” she told the Times. “His hands were everywhere.”
Crooks, who was working as a receptionist for a firm located in Trump Tower in 2005, said she met Trump outside an elevator in the building. According to Crooks, Trump shook her hand and would not let go, and then started kissing her on the mouth. 
Trump’s senior communications adviser, Jason Miller, called the Times article “fiction” and appeared to accuse the newspaper of plotting on behalf of Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. 
“For the New York Times to launch a completely false, coordinated character assassination against Mr. Trump on a topic like this is dangerous,” Miller said in a statement. He added: ”It is absurd to think that one of the most recognizable business leaders on the planet with a strong record of empowering women in his companies would do the things alleged in this story, and for this to only become public decades later in the final month of a campaign for president should say it all.”
Trump himself vehemently denied the allegations in an interview with the Times. He threatened to sue the paper if it published the story and called a Times reporter a “disgusting human being.”
“I don’t do it. I don’t do it,” he told the paper of his remarks about groping women on a 2005 recording that was released Friday. “It was locker room talk.”
McGillivray, the Florida woman who spoke to The Palm Beach Post, said Trump groped her at his Mar-a-Lago resort in 2003. 
“This was a pretty good nudge. More of a grab,” McGillivray told the paper. “It was pretty close to the center of my butt. I was startled. I jumped.’”
Trump spokeswoman Hope Hicks denied McGillivray’s allegations. 
The Washington Post on Friday published the 2005 recording in which Trump boasted of kissing women without their consent and grabbing them “by the pussy.” The recording upended the presidential campaign and many people, including Vice President Joe Biden, pointed out that Trump’s brag constituted sexual assault. 
Asked about the tape during Sunday’s debate with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, Trump denied sexually abusing anyone.
“Women have respect for me, and I will tell you: No, I have not,” Trump replied when asked by moderator Anderson Cooper if he had actually done the things he talked about in the recording. 
Trump has been repeatedly accused of groping women, with allegations dating back decades. Temple Taggart, a contestant in a Trump-owned beauty pageant, said earlier this year he kissed her on the mouth without her consent in 1997.CNN’s Erin Burnett recounted a similar story last week about a friend who said Trump tried to kiss her during a meeting in 2010.
“Trump took Tic Tacs, suggested I take them also,” Burnett said her friend told her. “He then leaned in, catching me off guard, and kissed me almost on lips. I was really freaked out.”
Cassandra Searles, who was crowned Miss Washington in a Trump-owned contest in 2013, wrote on Facebook earlier this year that Trump had “continually grabbed my ass and invited me to his hotel room.”
And Jill Harth, a former model, said Trump groped her under a table and attempted to force himself on her at his Mar-a-Lago estate. Trump has denied these allegations.
In the wake of Wednesday’s allegations, the Trump campaign plans to amplify attacks on former President Bill Clinton, telling Bloomberg the campaign has found women who say they were assaulted by the former president. 

Saturday, October 8, 2016

It’s Time To Bury Donald Trump Once And For All

 If Donald Trump does what he claims he does to women, he’s guilty of a crime punishable by time in prison. There’s no telling what Trump’s legal fate is over the next few years, but the first chance that the American public will have to cast judgment comes at the ballot box.
And that judgment holds the potential to be devastating: The American people are within striking distance of delivering the most brutal rejection of a major party candidate in U.S. history.
That title is currently held in the modern era by Democrat George McGovern, who won 37.4 percent of the vote in 1972 against Richard Nixon, a defeat so thorough that it marked the beginning of the end of the liberal wave that had begun with FDR and the New Deal.
Trump, according to HuffPost Pollster’s analysis, is now pulling in 42.5 percent of the vote. That was before he was caught on audio boasting about his penchant for sexual assault.
Trump supporters can do their part in driving Trump down to 37 percent by abandoning him in droves, as at least some elite Republicans are starting to do. But there’s also a role for people who were planning on sitting this one out because the Democratic alternative is less than inspiring, or because they don’t live in a swing state.
Helping make Trump the biggest loser in American history doesn’t require you to vote for Hillary Clinton. A vote for anybody other than Trump ― Green Jill Stein, Libertarian Gary Johnson, writing in your own name ― drives down Trump’s overall national percentage by driving up the total turnout.
Pushing his number down to 37 percent ― just 5 points below where he is now ― sends a signal to the rest of the world that America has not lost its mind, that we don’t stand for or with what Trump represents. It lets our children know that his behavior is deplorable. It’s a message to immigrants, to women, to Muslims, to the disabled, to veterans, to everybody he has humiliated or assaulted that Americans are on record declaring that Trump does not represent the values of this country.
No matter what state you live in, or which of the many candidates you want to vote for, get out and cast a ballot, and send that message. Make Donald Trump the biggest loser ever. 

Second Week of Congressional Hearings Increases Pressure on Trump US President Donald Trump faces the threat of further testimony that ...